JJCPF

Cemetery photography courtesy of Jewish Treasures of the Caribbean © Wyatt Gallery 2017

 
 

Hunts Bay - Parish of St Andrew

Hunt’s Bay Cemetery is located to the west of Kingston having been established before the founding of Kingston. Hunt’s Bay’s earliest grave stone dates to 1672 and its latest dates to the mid 19th century. 360 grave markers remain at Hunt’s Bay. Many markers have been destroyed or looted for construction over time. By Shai Fierst and Sam Petuchowski, Jamaica: Hunt’s Bay and Orange Street Cemeteries – March 2009

 
 
 
 

Kingston

The Jewish Cemetery on Orange Street, located near the beautiful and century-old Shaarei Shalom Synagogue, contains stones from the early 19th century and is still in use. The cemetery is located in the newer, northern end of Kingston. Previous to the Orange Street Cemetery, Kingston's Sephardim buried their dead in the no longer extant Old Kingston Jewish Cemetery in the older, southern part of Kingston's downtown. 18th century grave stones from the Old Kingston Jewish Cemetery were transposed to the Orange Street cemetery when the former was closed likely due to new sanitation laws of the growing city. The grave stones are found along the north and east cemetery walls, often partially covered under earth excavated by burials.
 By Shai Fierst and Sam Petuchowski, Jamaica: Hunt’s Bay and Orange Street Cemeteries – March 2009

 
 
 
 

Spanish Town - Parish of St Catherine

Formerly knows St. Jago de la Vega, St James of the Plain. This was the principal settlement of Spanish Jamaica and remained the official capital of the British colony until 1872. A Sephardi congregation was formed by migrants from Port Royal in 1692, and land for a synagogue was purchased in 1704. During the 18th century The Spanish Town Jewish community was the second largest in the island after Kingston. An Ashkenazi congregation was formed about 1790 and in 1844 united with the Sephardim and became known as the German and Portuguese Synagogue, but during the nineteenth century there was a steady exodus of Jewish families to Kingston (and abroad) , and after 1884 the synagogue was closed for regular worship.  The building, a replica of Bevis Marks synagogue in London, survived until about 1920. The Ashkenazi synagogue, erected in 1796, was pulled down in 1895, and the land sold. There are three disused burial grounds. 

First Beth Haim

S.E. of the junction of White Church Street and Burke Road. The land was purchased in 1692

 

Second Beth Haim

On Salt Pond Road. Established in the 1790's by the Ashkenazim.

Third Burial Ground

Adjoining the former synagogue, S.E. of the junction of Monk and Adelaide Street. The  surviving tombstones range in date from 1824 to 1886.   

 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Annotto Bay

A small stoned-walled burial ground on open land west of the village, long since disused, has been obliterated by recent development. It seems to have been originally for victims of the cholera epidemic of 1850, since there were five graves so marked. 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

St Ann's Bay - Parish of St. Ann

Remains of a disused burial ground, unfenced and neglected, on the west side of the Gully Road to Moneague, a few hundred yards from its junction with the main coast road. 

 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Falmouth - Parish of Trelawny

This town was founded in 1790 and for much of the nineteenth century most of its retail trade was in the hands of Jewish merchants. The burial gound in Duke Street was purchased early in the century from Edward Moulton Barrett of Wimple Street. London, owner of most of the land on which the town was built. 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Montego Bay - Parish of St. James

The old burial ground. a congregation was formed here in 1844 and a synagogue was consecrated the following year, but during the latter part of the century the congregation declined, and the synagogugue had fallen into disrepair sometime before it was destroyed in the hurricane of 1912. 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Lucea - Parish of Hanover

Jews Burial Ground - Burial ground adjoining the parish churchyard. A walled enclosure which is disused and derelict. The gatepost inscribed: "Jews Burial ground - Lucea 1833". 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Savanna-La-Mar - Parish of Westmoreland

A few tombstones partially buried in the yard or garden dwelling, 22 Beckford Street, are the only visible remnant of the eighteenth century burial ground. Joseph Ezikias Da Silva in his will dated 1768, bequeathed 100 pounds for an enclosing wall and iron gates, and portions of the wall and gate were still standing in the 1930's. 

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Lacovia - Parish of St Elizabeth

Tombstones partially buried, on the property of Mrs. Estrella Robinson, behind a small shop opposite the school house on the main road. Lacovia, now a small village, was in 1723 designated the capital of St Elizabeth Parish, and for half a century shared this honor with the town of Black River, the Assize Courts and Vestry Meetings being held alternately in each. Edward Long, History of Jamaica (1774) describes Lacovia as "mostly inhabited by Jews".

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute

 
 
 
 

Rowe's Corner- Manchester Parish 

Near Alligator Pond. Burial ground established by Mrs. Rebecca Sampson.

Cemetery information sourced from:

RD Barnett & P. Wright, The Jews of Jamaica Tombstones Inscriptions 1663 - 1880: Ben Zvi Institute